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Accepting an Offer

Accepting an Offer.

With all the effort involved in preparing your home, the showings, and so on,  now is the time to get real serious about signing the sales contract. Price is not always the determining factor when accepting an offer for several important reasons: the initial offer is usually not final, and there are a number of terms and conditions that may influence the final outcome of a price. You can trust Bob Harder to help you thoroughly evaluate every proposal without compromising your marketing position. He will go over the contract line by line and explain in detail the good and the bad, and advise you.

Don't get emotional during the negotiations.

The extent of most people’s experience in the art of negotiation begins and ends at their local auto dealership. And few of us have pleasant memories of haggling with car salesmen. But if you can just let go of the emotion you’ve invested in your home and approach negotiations in a detached, businesslike manner, you’ll find the process to be a lot less painful. In fact, you might even enjoy it—and you’ll definitely have an advantage over prospective buyers who get caught up in the emotion of the situation.

Don't take a low offers personally.

The first offer is invariably well below what you both know the buyer will end up paying for your property. Don’t get angry or feel insulted; evaluate the offer objectively. Make sure it spells out the offering price, adequate earnest money, amount of down payment, mortgage amount, a closing date and any special requests. Now you have a point from which you can negotiate.

Make sure the contract is complete.

The best way to avoid problems is to make sure that all terms, costs and responsibilities are spelled out in the contract of sale. A contract should include the date it was made, the names of the parties involved in the transaction, the address and parcel ID# of the property being sold, the purchase price, where deposit (escrow) monies will be held, the date for loan approval, the date and place of closing, type of deed, any other contingencies that remain to be settled, and whether there’s any personal property included (or not) in the sale, among other things.

Sign on the dotted line.

Now that you negotiated, and signed a sales contract, An effective agreement is a legal arrangement between a potential purchaser and the property’s seller. Laws vary from state to state, but in order to be a legally, binding agreement, the agreement may require consideration. This consideration (initial and additional deposit) is to be held in the closing agent’s escrow account pending the fulfillment of conditions or contingencies in the effective agreement.

Stick to the schedule.

Now that you have chosen your offer, you and the buyer will be given a timeline to mark every stage in the process of closing the real estate contract. Meeting the requirements on time ensures a smoother flow of negotiations and also ensures that each party involved is not in breach of their agreements. During the process we will keep you constantly updated so you will always be prepared for the next step.

These are just a sample of Bob Harder's 29 Essential Tips That Get Homes Sold Fast (and for top dollar) for the complete report, check the box not to ``29 Essential Tips That Get Homes Sold Fast (and for top dollar)`` then fill in your information below and press send.

To order any of Bob's special reports, that will save you time and money, just check the box
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Special reports for sellers.
Free Market Analysis
29 Essential Tips That Get Homes Sold Fast (and for top dollar)
How to Sell Your Home For the Highest Possible Price
29 Critical Questions to Ask a Realtor Before You List

Special Reports for buyers.
How to Avoid Paying to Much
A critical guide to home loans: Your options and how they affect your future

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